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Friday, May 26, 2017

Stix - Nashville Public Art

Stix - Nashville Public Art

Located in the 8th Avenue Roundabout near the Music City Center is Stix, Nashville's tallest piece of art. Stix is a collection of about 30 70-foot painted cedar poles. It is meant to be an homage to the painted wooden artwork of local Native Americans.

It's height might be impressive, but it still drew the ire of local watchdog groups who complain of its 3/4 of a million dollar price tag.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Shiloh Indian Mounds Site

Shiloh Indian Mounds Site

It's unusual to think that on an old historic site in rural West Tennessee contains an even older historic site, but that's what we have here.

The site is located near the Tennessee River in Hardin County. Archaeologists believe indigenous people used the mound as a burial site from around 1000-1450 AD. Later on, the Civil War Battle of Shiloh took place in and around the Archaeological Site.

The Shiloh Indian Mounds Site has been labelled a National Historic Site independent of the Shiloh National Military Park. For more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiloh_Indian_Mounds_Site

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

The Old Mill - Pigeon Forge

The Old Mill - Pigeon Forge (version 4)

In the early 1800s, this gristmill was built on the Little Pigeon river in what was then a small mountain community of Pigeon Forge. The mill, which was built to make meal and flour for the locals still does that today. The Old Mill even furnished electricity for the town until 1935.

In 1830, William Love dammed the Little Pigeon and started construction on the mill using 40' long yellow Poplar logs.

In those days, the mill was the hub of local activity and now, 180 years later is one of the most popular tourist spots around the Smoky Mountains. The adjoining restaurant is also one of the most popular in Pigeon Forge. The Old Mill is also on the National Register of Historic Places.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Stay on TENN58 and SEE Beautiful ROCK CITY

Stay on --> TENN58 and SEE Beautiful__ ROCK CITY

Stay on --> TENN58 and SEE Beautiful__ ROCK CITY

This is a few miles north of Chattanooga on highway TN58 inside the Hamilton County line. not far from Georgetown, TN

Update: It appears the part of the barn with the word ROCK has been replaced with new wood since this photo was taken.

Monday, May 22, 2017

Norfolk & Western #675 - Bluegrass Railway

Norfolk & Western #675 - Bluegrass Railway

Seen at the Bluegrass Railway Museum in Versailles, KY is the N&W Diesel Locomotive #675 which is now used for most of their excursion trains. The Class GP-9 Engine was built by E.M.D. of General Motors. It was donated by Consolidated Coal Corporation of Pittsburgh PA. She was restored at the Mid-America Locomotive Works in Evansville, Indiana, painted in N&W freight black and placed back in operational service in 2007. 675 is equipped with dual control stands, both of which are still operational. This allows the engineer to run the locomotive from either side of the cab.

When I was in the process of lining up this photo, a museum employee asked me to hold my pose so he could photograph me photographing the train. I guess I ought to ask them if I can get that picture from them. :)

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Cumberland Mountain State Park Stone Arch Bridge

Cumberland Mountain State Park Stone Arch Bridge View #6

Also known as Byrd Creek Bridge, this concrete stone arch bridge is the centerpiece of the Cumberland Mountain State Park near Crossville, TN. Here, a dam was built on Byrd Creek forming a lake on the southeast side. Highway TN419 carries the seven span bridge which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Cumberland Homesteads Historic District. Byrd Creek Dam is the largest masonry structure ever built by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Here is the text of the nearby historic marker:

Men of the Civilian Conservation Corps' Company 3464 built this unsuspended bridge between 1935 and 1940, for a 30-acre impoundment of Byrd's Creek. Three thousand five hundred and fifty cubic yards of dirt and rock were excavated and the core, containing 8,000 tons of concrete, is faced with Crab Orchard stone for the 319-foot span. Seven spillways, rising 28 feet above the stream bed, carry the 18-foot roadway approximately 16 feet above water level.

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Huntsville Madison County Veterans Memorial Aviator Statue

Huntsville Madison County Veterans Memorial Aviator Statue

The Huntsville Madison County Veterans Memorial Foundation dedicated this Aviator Statue on Veterans Day, 2015. The statue's face was modeled after Marine Captain Trey Wilbourn who died in Desert Storm. The bronze statue was created by local sculptor Dan Burch.

For the full story:
whnt.com/2015/01/19/huntsville-mother-eagerly-awaits-dedi...

Huntsville Madison County Veterans Memorial Aviator Statue

Friday, May 19, 2017

Hickerson's Motel Court

Hickerson's Motel Court

Located along Nolensville Rd. (US31A/41A) in the Woodbine area of Nashville. There used to be several Motels through this area, but these days it's probably not the kind of area you'd want to stay in. I'm not aware of any other motels near here. If you're familiar with the area, it's across from Phonoluxe record store, which I was always looking at and missing this cool old neon sign.

Hickerson's Motel Court

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Rock City's Fairyland Caverns: Cindarella

Rock City's Fairyland Caverns: Cindarella

After spending some time trying to see seven states and various unusual rock formations, visitors to Rock City finish their visit along the Enchanted Trail by enjoying the sights of Fairyland Cavern.

When Fairyland Caverns first opened, most of the scenes consisted of their gnome collection and related decor fitting a fairy tale theme, all moved into a new section of the park that needed a purpose. Then in the late 40s, Rock City hired Atlanta artist Jessie Sanders to create the glow-in-the-dark scenes from popular fairy tales and these are the scenes that still exist today.

The first thing Mrs. Sanders crafted was a deer that stands next to Snow White. From there, she created individual displays for different tales. Other than the first two scenes (which depict a mother reading bedtime stories to the children and then the children asleep with "Dream Fairies" flittering about) she was given free reign to create the scenes as inspiration struck. As the figures were cast from her Atlanta studio, they would be shipped to Rock City and installed after another artist, Marcus Lilly, would paint the backdrops. Jessie's husband Charles also helped create many of the props that are seen today.

After Jessie Sanders spent about a decade creating all of the vistas along the main hallway, she envisioned her most elaborate display in 1958. Mother Goose's Village was to be a large room with a miniature mountain, adorned by a castle, and many fairy tale characters seamlessly placed together to save the attraction's best for last. After six years of construction, the fantastic finale was opened to the public in May, 1964 delighting young and old since.

On my website, I have created a gallery entitled "A Tour of Rock City" where I not only have tried to photograph each individual display in Fairyland Caverns and much of Mother Goose's Village, but all the other wondrous scenes at the beloved tourist attraction.
seemidtn.com/gallery/index.php?album=chattanooga%2Frock-city

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Stones River Battlefield: Entrance to Civil War Cemetery

SRNB: Entrance to Civil War Cemetery

The Stones River National Battlefield is a park in Murfreesboro, TN along the Stones River in Rutherford County, TN. The park commemorates the Civil War battle that took place here on Dec. 31, 1862 and Jan. 2, 1863. The park was established using public and private funds, with significant help from the NCStL railway, and is now under the oversight of the U.S. National Park Service.

To see all of my Stones River Battlefield pictures, Look Here.

The entrance to the Park and the cemetery across the street are on Old Nashville Highway, which many years ago was the Dixie Highway.